Wednesday, August 4, 2021

Horrific moment grandfather-of-two, 76, ends up under the wheels of oncoming van

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This is the horrific moment a 76-year-old grandfather ended up under the wheels of an oncoming van after he lost control of his bicycle. 

Alan Thompson, a grandfather-of-two, was left in ‘excruciating’ pain after he careered into a van on his way back to the car park following a ride on one of the Peak District’s 19 most difficult routes.

Footage shows the moment Mr Thompson lost control on a blind turn, slammed into the ground and skidded before ending up underneath a large oncoming vehicle in October. 

He said: ‘The funny thing is that I had finished the ride, I was just making my way back to where the cars were parked. I was going down a steep hill and I went round a blind bend and lost control.

Alan Thompson, a grandfather-of-two, was left in 'excruciating' pain after he careered into a van on his way back to the car park following a ride on one of the Peak District's 19 most difficult routes. Pictured, after the fall

Alan Thompson, a grandfather-of-two, was left in 'excruciating' pain after he careered into a van on his way back to the car park following a ride on one of the Peak District's 19 most difficult routes. Pictured, after the fall

Alan Thompson, a grandfather-of-two, was left in ‘excruciating’ pain after he careered into a van on his way back to the car park following a ride on one of the Peak District’s 19 most difficult routes. Pictured, after the fall

Mr Thompson (pictured) suffered significant bruising to his pelvis

Mr Thompson (pictured) suffered significant bruising to his pelvis

Mr Thompson (pictured) suffered significant bruising to his pelvis

‘In the end, I was very lucky to escape with the injuries I did as it could have been much worse, although the pain was still excruciating.’

Mr Thompson suffered significant bruising to his pelvis but did not break any bones.

After postponing a few more months due to the pandemic, Mr Thompson finally started ticking more routes off his list on June 21.   

He said: ‘It wasn’t easy but I was doing the challenge for a good cause, which definitely kept me going when things got tough.’  

Mr Thompson said he ‘doesn’t let age stand in his way’, adding that he continued the hairbrained challenge after the crash to ‘have fun’ and raise money for charity.

He has now completed the Peak District’s 19 most difficult routes, which are full of steep hills and sheer descents that span a total of 310 miles.

Mr Thompson completed around half of the runs before the accident and finished them off over the past three weeks, ending on July 13, when he celebrated with friends and a bottle of Champagne. 

The cyclist said: ‘I love a challenge and thought, “I’ve never done anything quite as difficult as this so let’s do it”.

 Footage shows the moment Mr Thompson lost control on a blind turn, slammed into the ground and skidded before ending up underneath a large oncoming vehicle in October

He has now completed the Peak District's 19 most difficult routes, which are full of steep hills and sheer descents that span a total of 310 miles

He has now completed the Peak District's 19 most difficult routes, which are full of steep hills and sheer descents that span a total of 310 miles

He has now completed the Peak District’s 19 most difficult routes, which are full of steep hills and sheer descents that span a total of 310 miles

Mr Thompson completed around half of the runs before the accident and finished them off over the past three weeks, ending on July 13, when he celebrated with friends and a bottle of Champagne (pictured)

Mr Thompson completed around half of the runs before the accident and finished them off over the past three weeks, ending on July 13, when he celebrated with friends and a bottle of Champagne (pictured)

Mr Thompson completed around half of the runs before the accident and finished them off over the past three weeks, ending on July 13, when he celebrated with friends and a bottle of Champagne (pictured)

‘I’m not someone who lets my age stand in my way. I feel fit and well so I think, “if I can do it then why not?” I had a great time doing it, although it was very hard and I’d often get home after a long day feeling very sore.

‘But after a rest and a good night’s sleep I was always ready to go again.’

The Peak District’s 19 most challenging runs are an average of 20 miles long and take between two and four hours each.

They included countless steep hills followed by high-speed descents, which saw the active OAP travel at speeds of more than 35mph.

Mr Thompson, from Buxton, Derbs., said: ‘It was a brilliant thing to do, I had a lot of fun.’

He has been running a crowdfunding page throughout, which has so far raised more than £6,500.

His donations will go to charities Connex Community Support and Buxton Street By Street, which provide help to the vulnerable people of Buxton and nearby villages. 

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