Kathy Griffin has revealed she has stage one lung cancer despite never smoking cigarettes and that she will have to have her left lung removed.

The 60-year-old actor-comedienne took to Instagram on Monday to reveal her diagnosis.

‘I’ve got to tell you guys something. I have cancer,’ she told her fans on Instagram.

‘I have lung cancer – and I’ve never smoked’: Kathy Griffin, 60, revealed on Instagram on Monday she has stage one of the disease and will have surgery to have half her lung removed

News: Kathy shared this post on Instagram on Monday

News: Kathy shared this post on Instagram on Monday

News: Kathy shared this post on Instagram on Monday

‘I’m going to go into surgery to have half of my left lung removed. Yes, I have lunch cancer even though I’ve never smoked!’ she continued.

She went on to tell her fans that the doctors are ‘very optimistic,’ that surgery will be able to get rid of all the cancer and that no chemo or radiation will be required.

While announcing that she has lung cancer, Griffin also announced that she is vaccinated for COVID and that if she wasn’t, her condition might have been worse.

‘Of course I am fully vaccinated for Covid.

‘The consequences for being unvaccinated would have been ever more serious.’ 

In her post, Griffin also alluded to a difficult period that coincided with the Trump presidency.

‘It’s been a helluva 4 years, trying to get back to work, making you guys laugh and entertaining you, but I’m gonna be just fine,’ she wrote. 

Griffin went on to tell her fans that the doctors are 'very optimistic,' that surgery will be able to get rid of all the cancer and that no chemo or radiation will be required

Griffin went on to tell her fans that the doctors are 'very optimistic,' that surgery will be able to get rid of all the cancer and that no chemo or radiation will be required

Griffin went on to tell her fans that the doctors are ‘very optimistic,’ that surgery will be able to get rid of all the cancer and that no chemo or radiation will be required

Why do many non-smokers get lung cancer? Experts blame second-hand smoke and radon, a toxic element found in rocks and soil

Lung cancer is one of the most common and serious types of cancer. 

According to the American Cancer Society, there will be an estimated 235,760 new cases of lung cancer in 2021.

Of those, 119,100 will be reported in men while 116,660 will be diagnosed in women.

The ACS expects that there will be a total of around 131,880 deaths from lung cancer. Of those, more than half – 69,410 – will be men while 62,470 will be women.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data shows that in the US about 10 percent to 20 percent of lung cancers, or 20,000 to 40,000 lung cancers each year, happen in people who never smoked or smoked fewer than 100 cigarettes in their lifetime.

Researchers estimate that secondhand smoke contributes to about 7,300 cases and exposure to radon, a radioactive gas that has no taste or odor, to about 2,900 cases of these lung cancers.

Radon is emitted in varying quantities or concentrations from radioactive elements, for example Uranium, that are naturally present in rocks and soils. 

Epidemiological studies on the health of miners undertaken by the United States Public Health Service during the 1950s and 1960s established a link between higher concentrations of Radon and incidences of lung cancer.

As Radon is emitted from the ground, it quickly dilutes in the atmosphere into relatively harmless concentrations.

But in confined and unventilated spaces in buildings, in basements and in underground mines, it’s concentration levels can become dangerously high. 

Radon itself does not really cause tissue damage.

It is the decay products, sometimes referred to as the progeny or daughters of Radon, that do.

Radon gas may be inhaled and exhaled with little damaging effect.

But the decay products include Radon – 222 (derived from Uranium – 238) and Radon – 220 (also known as Thoron, and derived from Thorium – 232), and other progeny including Polonium-218, 214 and 210, that can.

In fact, Radon – 222, is on the World Health Organization’s list of things that definitely cause cancer.

Epidemiological studies on the health of miners undertaken by the United States Public Health Service during the 1950s and 1960s also established a link between higher concentrations of Radon and incidences of lung cancer.

Usually, lung cancer is diagnosed too late for a good chance at survival. 

Last year, researchers reported the largest-ever one-year decline in the US cancer death rate, a drop they credited to advances in lung-tumor treatments.

The overall cancer death rate has been falling about 1.5 percent a year since 1991.

It fell 2.2 percent from 2016 to 2017. That’s the largest drop ever seen in national cancer statistics going back to 1930, said Rebecca Siegel, the lead author.

‘It’s absolutely driven by lung cancer,’ which accounts for about a quarter of all cancer deaths, she said.

Take lung cancer out of the mix, and the 2017 rate drop is 1.4 percent, she added.  

There are usually no signs or symptoms in the early stages of lung cancer, but many people with the condition eventually develop symptoms including:

– a persistent cough

– coughing up blood

– persistent breathlessness

– unexplained tiredness and weight loss

– an ache or pain when breathing or coughing

You should see a GP if you have these symptoms.

Types of lung cancer 

There are two main forms of primary lung cancer. 

These are classified by the type of cells in which the cancer starts growing. 

They are:

– Non-small-cell lung cancer. The most common form, accounting for more than 87 per cent of cases. 

– It can be one of three types: squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma or large-cell carcinoma.

– Small-cell lung cancer – a less common form that usually spreads faster than non-small-cell lung cancer.

– The type of lung cancer you have determines which treatments are recommended.

Who’s affected

Lung cancer mainly affects older people. It’s rare in people younger than 40. 

Although people who have never smoked can develop lung cancer, smoking is the most common cause (accounting for about 72 per cent of cases). 

This is because smoking involves regularly inhaling a number of different toxic substances.

Treating lung cancer

Treatment depends on the type of mutation the cancer has, how far it’s spread and how good your general health is.

If the condition is diagnosed early and the cancerous cells are confined to a small area, surgery to remove the affected area of lung may be recommended.

If surgery is unsuitable due to your general health, radiotherapy to destroy the cancerous cells may be recommended instead.

If the cancer has spread too far for surgery or radiotherapy to be effective, chemotherapy is usually used.

There are also a number of medicines known as targeted therapies. 

They target a specific change in or around the cancer cells that is helping them to grow. 

Targeted therapies cannot cure lung cancer but they can slow its spread.

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Last year, Griffin suffered a health scare after she was rushed to the hospital with an abdominal infection.

She revealed on social media that she had ‘UNBEARABLY PAINFUL symptoms’ that seemed to be linked to COVID-19.

But once inside the ER, the My Life On The D-List star said she could not get tested for the virus due to CDC restrictions even though she was at a ‘major’ hospital.

Last year, Griffin also announced that her mother Maggie Griffin passed away at the age of 99.

She took to social media to share her sad news with her fans who grew to know Maggie through her appearance for six seasons on the Bravo TV show Kathy Griffin: My Life on the D-List.

Last year, Griffin suffered a health scare after she was rushed to the hospital with an abdominal infection. She initially feared that her symptoms were linked to COVID-19

Last year, Griffin suffered a health scare after she was rushed to the hospital with an abdominal infection. She initially feared that her symptoms were linked to COVID-19

Last year, Griffin suffered a health scare after she was rushed to the hospital with an abdominal infection. She initially feared that her symptoms were linked to COVID-19 

Also last year, Griffin announced the passing of her mother Maggie, 99. Her tribute read: 'My Mom, the one and only, Maggie Griffin, passed away today. I am gutted. My best friend. I'm shaking.' Seen with her mother in 2010

Also last year, Griffin announced the passing of her mother Maggie, 99. Her tribute read: 'My Mom, the one and only, Maggie Griffin, passed away today. I am gutted. My best friend. I'm shaking.' Seen with her mother in 2010

Also last year, Griffin announced the passing of her mother Maggie, 99. Her tribute read: ‘My Mom, the one and only, Maggie Griffin, passed away today. I am gutted. My best friend. I’m shaking.’ Seen with her mother in 2010

Griffin's cancer diagnosis comes after a tumultuous period during which she was one of the more vocal Hollywood figures opposed to former President Donald Trump. Griffin, 60, is seen with an expressionless look holding the bloodied head of an effigy of Donald Trump. The image, posted in 2017, sparked outrage. She was fired by CNN from its New Year's Eve broadcast

Griffin's cancer diagnosis comes after a tumultuous period during which she was one of the more vocal Hollywood figures opposed to former President Donald Trump. Griffin, 60, is seen with an expressionless look holding the bloodied head of an effigy of Donald Trump. The image, posted in 2017, sparked outrage. She was fired by CNN from its New Year's Eve broadcast

Griffin’s cancer diagnosis comes after a tumultuous period during which she was one of the more vocal Hollywood figures opposed to former President Donald Trump. Griffin, 60, is seen with an expressionless look holding the bloodied head of an effigy of Donald Trump. The image, posted in 2017, sparked outrage. She was fired by CNN from its New Year’s Eve broadcast

‘I am gutted,’ Kathy wrote on Instagram alongside a photo showing her and her mom sitting side by side on an outdoor sofa overlooking an infinity pool and a scenic canyon.

In June of last year, Griffin commemorated her mother on what would have been her 100th birthday.

She shared a series of photos of her late mother, remembering her ‘beautiful, hilarious and spontaneous’ spirit. 

Griffin’s cancer diagnosis comes after a tumultuous period during which she was one of the more vocal Hollywood figures opposed to former President Donald Trump. 

In 2017 she posted a video of herself to Instagram where she was holding a mask made to look like the severed, bloody head of Trump.

‘I caption this “there was blood coming out of his eyes, blood coming out of his…wherever,”‘ she said.

The shoot was from photographer Tyler Shields. 

Griffin later took down the image, and apologized publicly. CNN fired her from its New Year’s Eve broadcast with Anderson Cooper because of it. 

Griffin initially apologized for the photograph but later revoked that statement and now stands by the photo and insists it was free speech. 

At the time, Trump said Griffin ‘should be ashamed of herself’, calling the stunt ‘sick’ and claiming that his young son Barron was ‘having a hard time with this’.

Chelsea Clinton, the daughter of Bill and Hillary Clinton, called it ‘vile and wrong’ and said it was ‘never funny to joke about killing a president’.

Griffin was dropped from CNN’s New Year’s Eve show and co-host Anderson said the photo was ‘clearly disgusting and completely inappropriate’.

She had been the co-host of CNN’s New Year’s Eve broadcast for 10 years before she was fired in the aftermath of the photo. 

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